Lane launches substance abuse treatment center

April 2016: Untold numbers of people wake up each morning addicted to heroin, pain pills, alcohol or numerous other substances. Many of these people are in a conflicted struggle, not admitting to themselves that they are addicted, or perhaps wanting to end the addiction but unable to resist their addiction alone. Often, they are still living in the same circumstances that led to the addiction in the first place, and they may not know that help is available or how to get it. Patients suffering from these conditions typically feel lost and alone. There isn’t any way for them to “just snap out of it.”

If that addicted person is you or someone you care about, you need to know that a pathway exists to recovery and long-term sobriety. The first step on that path is to call Lane Recovery Solutions. Open since February 15, 2016, this program of Lane Regional Medical Center is a substance abuse treatment program located on Lane’s campus at 4801 McHugh Road, Suite A, in Zachary.
Lane Recovery Solutions is a structured program of outpatient treatment of addiction and psychiatric services provided to adults over the age of 18 who are impaired by one or more addictive substances. It is a medically-directed, comprehensive and highly-structured treatment program designed for those who need direct medical supervision but do not yet require overnight stays in a hospital setting.

“I don’t believe in shame-based therapy, These people are already feeling shame and guilt. They need feedback from others, and to see how a better life is possible for them.” Dr. Louis Cataldie, MD,  medical director of Lane Recovery Solutions

“I don’t believe in shame-based therapy, These people are already feeling shame and guilt. They need feedback from others, and to see how a better life is possible for them.” Dr. Louis Cataldie, MD, medical director of Lane Recovery Solutions

Treatment, described as semi or partial hospitalization, is more intense than the care typically provided in a doctor’s or therapist’s office and is often an alternative to inpatient care. Typically, patients receive six hours of care per day, five days a week, for approximately six weeks, although some may require a week less or a week or two more.
Dr. Louis Cataldie, MD, is the medical director of Lane Recovery Solutions. Dr. Cataldie has more than 30 years of addiction medicine experience and previously served as Medical Director for the Physician Health Program of the State of Louisiana, Medical Director for the Louisiana State Board of Nursing, and Medical Director for the Office of Addictive Disorders for the State of Louisiana.
Regarding the establishment of Lane Recovery Solutions, Dr. Cataldie said, “There was an obvious need for the community at large for this type of progra

Nurse Katie Bell administers a breathalyzer test at Lane Recovery Solutions.

Nurse Katie Bell administers a breathalyzer test at Lane Recovery Solutions.

m. People in the United States use 90 percent of all opioid prescriptions in the world. Very few people start out using heroin; they often start with pain pills, Ambien, Xanax and other prescriptions drugs which often become the gateway to heroin and other illicit substances.”
Patients go to Lane Recovery Solutions during the day, five days a week, usually 8:30 am-3:30 pm, and go home at night. If they need a structured living arrangement, it can be provided. And, if needed, the doctor will make a referral for treatment in a more intense environment.

The Lane Recovery Solutions program includes individual and family therapy, group therapy, counseling, and education.

The Lane Recovery Solutions program includes individual and family therapy, group therapy, counseling, and education.

Services include comprehensive assessments, individualized treatment plans, group therapy, individual counseling, family counseling, outpatient detoxification, drug and alcohol testing, relapse prevention training, Vivitrol therapy, medication management, psychiatric referral, aftercare services and follow-up.
The people Dr. Cataldie has seen since Lane Recovery Solutions opened have been “truly a mixture of people of all ages from all backgrounds using a variety of types of drugs.”
Dr. Cataldie said, “We see a lot of alcoholism, also. Unfortunately we have a drinking culture, where kids often start drinking at age 16 or younger; where our entertainment is centered around food and drinking; and we‘re ‘supposed’ to drink at crawfish boils, tailgating parties, festivals and other events.
“Lane Recovery Solutions has already had a lot of positive results in people and their families. We’re not negating the value of inpatient treatment; this type of semi-hospitalization bridges the gap between inpatient and outpatient. The advantage of semi-hospitalization is that there are many people who have obligations and responsibilities. Some are single moms taking care of children or working professionals, so they can go home in the evenings – assuming their environment is safe.”
If a person does not have a place to live safe from emotional and physical abuse, away from drug-using peers or relatives, drug suppliers and enablers, the next step is to get temporary housing for them (called sober houses).
“They cannot be successful in stopping the addiction if they go back into situations where others are using,” Dr. Cataldie explained. “They will eventually have to cope with the realities of their life, but they need at least two months away from destructive situations to have a chance to recover.”
The Lane Recovery Solutions program includes individual and family therapy, group therapy, counseling, and education.
“I don’t believe in shame-based therapy,” stated Dr. Cataldie. “These people are already feeling shame and guilt. They need feedback from others, and to see how a better life is possible for them.”
The human brain is still developing in the teenage years and into young adulthood, at least until the mid-20s, so drugs can have a detrimental impact on the final development of their brain.
Part of the therapy includes neurophysiology – understanding the chemical changes that happen to the brain when a person is abusing drugs, how the chemicals take over, and how to change their behavior to prevent that from happening again.
“We help them recognize what the triggers in their lives might be and how to avoid them,” said Dr. Cataldie.
Because living at home gives the opportunity to drink and use drugs, clients are breathalyzed on a frequent random basis. They also are given urine tests for various drugs. When people know they are going to be screened and held responsible, they are more likely to abstain.
The program also accepts addicts who are pregnant. “There are not a lot of resources out there for those women, but help is available here, and it’s critical that they get it now,” Dr. Cataldie emphasized. “It is important to get the word out that we offer treatment to pregnant women even though many others don’t. If the expectant mothers don’t interrupt the abuse process, they will give birth to babies who are addicted. We work with their obstetrician to put them in a stabilization detoxification program.”
Another group of people who have a critical need for help are those in healthcare positions who are abusing drugs.
“It’s almost an occupational hazard for folks who handle drugs 24/7 to have such access to the drugs,” said Dr. Cataldie. “ Because they understand how drugs work, they feel comfortable taking them, thinking they can control it. But then it becomes a problem, and they try to solve it alone because they feel ashamed and don’t want to risk losing their jobs. It’s very difficult to do by themselves, and there is a high suicide risk for them, but the recovery rate nationwide is 90% for medical professionals who seek help. Instead of firing them, if their board offers the alternative of going into a recovery program like ours, we can help them keep their license if they successfully complete the program. By offering an alternative program, it encourages the person to reach out for help. Also, the person working next to the abuser is more likely to confront them when they know the person can get help and keep their license after being rehabilitated.”
After they complete the program, clients return to Lane Recovery Solutions once a week for 52 weeks of aftercare for support and to talk about how things are going.
Lane Recovery Solutions is very supportive of the 12 step recovery model for Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous.
Recognizing substance abuse and seeking help
People don’t become addicted overnight, so the signs of abuse may be gradual and difficult to recognize. Some indicators are: pupils are small, persistent runny nose, yawning a lot, fidgeting, gastrointestinal problem, sweaty, mood swings, irate, having a negative outlook, feeling suicidal, or no interest or enthusiasm about anything. However, these symptoms can also be signs of depression.
Usually, the last place drug abuse will become obvious is in the workplace because people work hard to conceal it to save their jobs. If you are seeing abuse in a co-worker on the job, it is likely in the very serious stage.
People do not always recognize that drug abuse is their problem. They may not understand how addictive drugs are, or they make up – and begin to believe – excuses. They blame their problems on other people, their job, their boss, family, circumstances, bad luck – anything but addiction.
Most often, people seek help because of a crisis somewhere along the line, after the drugs cause them to divorce, lose a job, lose custody of children, get a DUI, or receive an ultimatum from family members.
Physician referrals are not required. Anyone may contact Lane Recovery Solutions directly, especially individuals who want to reclaim their lives from the torments of addiction, as well as family members, friends and employers. People from the entire Greater Baton Rouge region, not just Zachary, are eligible for the program. Most commercial insurance plans and Medicare are accepted.
Lane Recovery Solutions meets the evidence-based standards set by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration and the Joint Commission.

Details:

Lane Recovery Solutions, 4801 McHugh Road, Suite A, on the campus of Lane Regional Medical Center in Zachary. For more information or to schedule a confidential assessment, call 225-658-6640 or visit LaneRMC.org/LaneRecoverySolutions. All consultations are confidential.

Lane Recovery Solutions Medical Director
Louis Cataldie, MD, joined the hospital medical staff in February as Medical Director of Lane Recovery Solutions, a substance abuse treatment program located at 4801 McHugh Road, Suite A, in Zachary.
Originally from Alexandria, Dr. Cataldie graduated from Northeast University in Monroe, earned his medical doctorate degree from Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans and completed his training in general practice at Lafayette Charity Hospital.
Dr. Cataldie is board certified by the American Board of Addiction Medicine to provide detoxification, evaluation and treatment for both inpatients and outpatients wishing to recover from the brain disease of addiction. In addition to being a Diplomate of the American Board of Addiction Medicine, he is also a Certified Medical Review Officer.
Dr. Cataldie previously served as medical director for the Physician Health Program of the State of Louisiana, the Louisiana State Board of Nursing, and the Office of Addictive Disorders for the State of Louisiana. He was also coroner of East Baton Rouge Parish for two terms.
During Hurricane Katrina Dr. Cataldie was appointed Medical Examiner for the State of Louisiana and the Incident Commander of the Family Assistance Center. He was in charge of the recovery and identification of deceased victims and finding the location of more than 26,000 missing/displaced persons. Upon completion of that mission, he returned to the field of addiction medicine.
Dr. Cataldie has been practicing in the Baton Rouge area since 1975 and has more than 30 years of extensive clinical and administrative experience in the field of addiction medicine. As a published author, he is a sought after public speaker on the diseases of addiction and is actively involved in community service, serving on the I CARE Advisory Board.
He is currently a member of the Louisiana State Medical Society, Capital Area Medical Society, American Society of Addiction Medicine, and Federation of State Physician Health Programs.

Other medical staff of  Lane Recovery Solutions includes:

Sarah Cobb, LPC, LAC, CCS,

Sarah Cobb, LPC, LAC, CCS,

Sarah Cobb is an experienced licensed addiction counselor who can answer any questions you may have about the program. She will walk you through what to expect and will provide guidance and support throughout your recovery process.

Katie Bell, RN

Katie Bell, RN

Katie Bell has extensive experience in nursing with a focus in mental health. She has a passion for working with people who suffer from addictions, especially helping healthcare professionals in addiction gain sobriety while maintaining their professional licenses.

Signs… Danger… Cost…
How do I know if someone is addicted to drugs?
If a person is compulsively seeking and using a drug (or drugs) despite negative consequences, such as loss of job, mounting debt, family problems, or physical problems brought on by drug abuse, then he or she probably is addicted. And while people who are addicted may believe they can stop any time, most often they cannot, and they will need professional help—first to determine if they in fact are addicted, and then to obtain drug abuse treatment. Support from friends and family can be critical in getting people into treatment and helping them to maintain abstinence following treatment.
Danger to our young people
from prescription drugs
We hear about the dangers of heroin, but prescription abuse is even more dangerous to young adults ages 18-25. More than any other age group, they have the highest incidence of abuse of prescription drugs, and more of them died from prescription drug overdoses than died in 2014 from overdoses of any other drug, including heroin and cocaine combined – and many more needed emergency treatment to save their lives.
They abuse prescription opioid pain relievers, ADHD stimulants, anti-anxiety drugs, and others, for all kinds of reasons, often initially because they think stimulants will help them relax, concentrate, deal with problems, study better, lose weight, sleep, be more alert or a myriad of other reasons. They often end up addicted and continue using just to get high.
How are prescriptions drugs obtained? There are many ways in addition to being bought on the street. A few that you may not think of: family, visitors and babysitters often raid the family medicine cabinet when in someone else’s home; they’re stolen from grandma’s purse; grandma or other relatives sell their prescribed pain killers to obtain money to pay for other prescribed medications they need; burglary; forging prescriptions; consulting multiple doctors and filling prescriptions at multiple pharmacies; altering prescriptions to increase the quantity.
State and local police agencies are increasingly reporting diverted pharmaceuticals as their greatest drug threat, based on both prevalence of the problem and related issues of misuse-related crime involvement and gang activity.
The cost of drug abuse
According to the federal government’s National Institute on Drug Abuse, the abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs is costly to our nation, exacting more than $700 billion annually in costs related to crime, lost work productivity and health care.
The healthcare costs alone of nonmedical use of prescription opioids – the most commonly misused class of prescription drugs – are estimated to total $72.5 billion annually.
Burglaries, embezzlement, car thefts, robberies, and numerous other crimes all the way up to murders can be traced to drug abuse. The cost of lives disrupted or destroyed – users, their families and innocent people – is immeasurable.

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